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The problem

The existing types of publishing are not necessarily conducive to open access nor to the desired degree of transparency in the science system. In addition, entry obstacles can be identified for researchers, incumbent publishers and new publishers, with an inhibitive effect on innovation in knowledge transfer. Moreover, the current subscription models are not financially viable.
Although digitisation, globalisation and the development of the Internet have tremendously changed and accelerated communication in general, the academic communication process remains fairly traditional and currently involves increasingly unbearable costs. Excessive time periods between submission and publication, payment walls, embargos and other access barriers impede the transfer of knowledge. This obstructs the evolution towards an open and transparent academic process and the associated knowledge exchange with society at large.

The solution 

Provide a framework for developing new publishing models, which can be achieved by creating a concise set of open access principles for publishing models. This should be done by the stakeholders. 


Concrete actions 

  • Publishers, research funders and Research Performing Organisations: promote mutual understanding and agree on open access principles like transparency, competition, sustainability, fair pricing, economic viability and pluralism.
  • Research funders and Research Performing Organisations: realign and coordinate activities, as both funders and research organisations pay for subscriptions and article processing charges.


Expected positive effects

  • A framework for further development of open access publishing models and services.|


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9 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    In my assessment, this paragraph is really weak, vague and not convincing!

    • First of all: The headline of this paragraph is rather disappointing. Why not something more concrete like “Foster and accelerate the transition to open access?” The principles have been discussed for more than a decade now!
    • Delete "Excessive time periods between submission and publication" as this issue has nothing to do with OA

    Georg Botz


     

  2. Anonymous

    Re: Concrete actions

    item 1:Maybe this is a question of wording only, but these are not “OA principles” but rather principles to be considered during the transition to OA.

     

    I wonder why not concrete action is listed which addresses national authorities?

    Here is one suggestion:

    National authorities: give due consideration to the fact that public funds for journal subscriptions often come from other ministries or institutions than those directly responsible for funding research; rebalance those budgets accordingly.

     

    Georg Botz

     

  3. Anonymous

    I'd like to suggest the following actions be considered, which, I think will make it easier to achieve the over arching ambition around making all research OA by 1/1/2020

    Concrete actions:

    • National authorities, research funders, Research Performing Organisations and e-infra organisations: establish open access policies which, as a minimum, requires all research articles to be made freely available and openly licenced (CC-BY) within 6 months of publication (for STEM subjects) and 12 months for all other disciplines
    • National authorities, research funders, Research Performing Organisations and e-infra organisations: develop funding mechanisms to explicitly support the development of open access publishing
    • National authorities, research funders, Research Performing Organisations and e-infra organisations: establish policies to proactively encourage the transition from subscriptions to OA


    Robert Kiley, Wellcome Trust

  4. Anonymous

    Perhaps an action here, or elsewhere in the document, would be to for national authorities, funders and RPOs to:

    1. align their OA policies as far as possible, to reduce the complexity in the policy environment
    2. express those policies using a standard set of terms, for which we have agreed definitions.

    Similarly, journal publishers might express any OA policies associated with journals using standard and well-defined terms.
     
    Neil Jacobs / Jisc, UK

  5. Anonymous

    on behalf of CC Europe

    The adoption of open access principles in support of new models of publishing is a worthy goal. But any principles developed should tackle a wider set of issues than those identified: “transparency, competition, sustainability, fair pricing, economic viability and pluralism.” Open access principles should take into account long-standing principles already described in Budapest Open Access Initiative, which includes recommendations on public policy changes, licensing, infrastructure support, and advocacy. In addition to “Publishers, research funders and Research Performing Organisations,” stakeholders should also include researchers, students, and the public.


    Gwen Franck, Regional Coordinator Europe
  6. Re: the following excerpt: "Provide a framework for developing new publishing models, which can be achieved by creating a concise set of open access principles for publishing models. This should be done by the stakeholders.", I would like to note the following.  There are already a few new publishing models, one of which is provided by Linguistics in Open Access (www.lingoa.eu), that is the Fair Open Access model developed by LingOA, and that can be applied in other disciplines as well.

     

    Johan Rooryck, EiC Glossa & President, LingOA

  7. Anonymous

    Under 'The solution' I propose changing the last sentence as follows: "This should be done in collaboration between all relevant stakeholders. 

    Dagmar Meyer, Brussels

  8. Anonymous

    Michael Matlosz, President Science Europe:

    I agree with this section and I’m happy to provide an example of some of our principles at Science Europe.

    As part of a simple set of easy to align principles, Science Europe members demand the following as minimal standards for Open Access (OA) publishing:

    • Proper indexing of OA journals in recognised databases  so that journal quality is assured;
    • Authors keep full copyright ownership;
    • OA content has to be archived immediately and sustainably in third-party repositories;
    • OA means machine readable.

     For the full set of SE principles:

    http://www.scienceeurope.org/uploads/PublicDocumentsAndSpeeches/WGs_docs/SE_POA_Pos_Statement_WEB_FINAL_20150617.pdf

  9. Anonymous

    Natalia Manola on behalf of OpenAIRE:

    This topic seems to overlap with other topics and actions seem to repeat. For example, an open access principle is related to TDM (e.g., right to read is the right to mine).

    Publication models here refers to publications and not data, which is a bit confusing.

    Solution:

    Closely monitor all types of publication models, and put into the equation not only costs but social good.

    Concrete actions:

    National authorities, research funders, Research Performing Organizations and e-infra organizations: establish open access policies which, as a minimum, requires all research articles to be made freely available and openly licenced (CC-BY) within 6 months of publication (for STEM subjects) and 12 months for all other disciplines.

    Support and enhance existing e-Infrastructures (e.g., OpenAIRE, PMC Europe, and national e-Infrastructures) to provide Open Access and Open Science services (support, training, technologies).